Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Its hard out there for a law prof

http://prawfsblawg.blogs.com/prawfs blawg/2013/05/reflections e36m305/09/13
First of all Prof. Hill, what makes you think that anyone ca massivemissive05/09/13
Poor poor you 'Professor' Hill, how terrible for you to have relater205/09/13
Jessie, I greatly enjoyed your rhapsodic musings on the i noochness05/10/13
Why don't you guys comment on her post and let her know how superttthero05/10/13
You know, this job involves doing different things at differ dybbuk05/10/13
This jam goes out to all the law professors, hustlin' for wh therewillbeblood05/10/13
Funny too how she all but admits by her boredom that law sch relater205/10/13
She deleted my comment which wasn't all that over the top - massivemissive05/10/13
Ha. That post is certainly going to go over well. keithlee05/10/13
She has seriously written seven (7!) law review articles on ichininosan05/10/13
This borders on parody it's so smug. It's sorta written i anotherjd05/10/13
It is going to be even harder when these "profs" have to ans dtejd199705/10/13
She's not evil like Leiter, just out of touch. anotherjd05/10/13
I thought this was a parody when I first read it. LOL patentesq05/10/13
This lady falsely assumes that her exertion in putting out l depressedandhungry05/10/13
Her most essential task is to fairly grade the exams that di anotherjd05/10/13
You know the thing about it is I doubt that even academics d massivemissive05/10/13
If she thinks grading 80 exams every semester is tedious, sh depressedandhungry05/10/13
Depressed...you should consider adding your thoughts in the noobesq205/10/13
Honestly I think it's useless to engage these people on Praw lolskewl05/10/13
I disagree. It might be useless to put a repeat offender in noobesq205/10/13
Student outcomes should be top priority, but they are not. I lolskewl05/10/13

e36m3 (May 9, 2013 - 10:27 pm)

http://prawfsblawg.blogs.com/prawfsblawg/2013/05/reflections-on-the-rhythm-of-academic-life.html#more

Reflections on the Rhythm of Academic Life

Apologies for showing up a bit late to the Prawfs party, and many thanks to Dan for inviting me back again. Like many of you, no doubt, I am overwhelmed at the moment with grading and administrative responsibilities, so the most I can muster here today is a post about academic life. I hope to provide more substantive posts later in the month.

I often find myself reflecting about the rhythm of academic life at this time of year, when the day-to-teach teaching routine of the regular semester seemingly grinds to a halt and my day is suddenly filled with stacks of papers and exams, along with the accompanying tedium of assessing them with a grade.

I remember thinking long ago that an appealing part of becoming a professor would be the up-and-down rhythm of each academic year: first, the intensity of the semester with regular teaching, student and colleague interactions, meetings, and—squeezed in between those—some writing and conferences; then, the slow, lazy pace of summers, with lots of time for reading and reflection combined with intensive writing in large, uninterrupted chunks. Although the summers have not usually turned out quite as relaxed as I had imagined, and although other fields (litigation, for example), do offer a similar up-and-down rhythm, I have found that I appreciate this rhythm for more than just the intermittent respite and constant variety it provides.

I find that the (often frantically) present-focused pace of the semester, together with the mundane, if not frankly mind-numbing, task of grading exams, actually stimulates creativity and original thought. There is nothing that makes me itch to get back to writing like a stack of 80 exams, all answering the same three issue-spotter questions, to slog through while painstakingly allocating point values to each issue discussed. There’s nothing that sends my mind off on tangents like trying to force it to focus on one narrow set of doctrinal questions. (And at the same time, there is nothing that builds excitement for getting back in the classroom like a summer spent navel-gazing in the form of a lengthy law review article.) But the creative power of disciplining oneself to do non-creative work is something that I have come to value greatly, and I might even dare to say that I am in some sense more productive (though perhaps not in the pages-written-per-day sense) when I am most busy with other things. How about you?


Posted by Jessie Hill on May 9, 2013 at 09:39 AM in Life of Law Schools | Permalink

Reply Like (0)
massivemissive (May 9, 2013 - 10:39 pm)

First of all Prof. Hill, what makes you think that anyone cares about these ramblings of yours?

Reply Like (0)
relater2 (May 9, 2013 - 11:09 pm)

Poor poor you 'Professor' Hill, how terrible for you to have to grade a few exams to pick up your 200k+ salary. Hopefully your school will close soon and you can get that partner track BigLaw job you so obviously could be doing now.

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noochness (May 10, 2013 - 12:14 am)

Jessie,

I greatly enjoyed your rhapsodic musings on the idylls of the academic life. Your ample musings on the blessings and curses of tending to our young charges is a true sign of you coming into your own as a scholar and an academic and I am prouder now than ever for vouching for your qualifications at the subcommittee level. Also, in the spirit of appreciating the rhythm for more than just the intermittent respite and constant variety that proffing provides, I must compliment you on the shape of your ass.

Your trusted colleague,

Jim

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superttthero (May 10, 2013 - 12:42 am)

Why don't you guys comment on her post and let her know how you feel?

Reply Like (0)
dybbuk (May 10, 2013 - 2:05 am)

You know, this job involves doing different things at different times of the year. How can I express that poetically? Up-and-down rhythm. Beautiful turn of phrase, don’t you think? Up means actively scamming kids during the fall and spring. Down means a lazy summer of expressing my creativity by writing law review articles, with no students around to intrude on my beautiful mind.

This time of year is final exam time, which is the worst. It is very boring and tedious, having to stamp grades on all those exams. It is so boring and tedious that I don’t even notice that lives are being ruined based on the grades I stamp. I am just too bored to notice. But, here is the thing: the boringness stimulates my creativity, like Picasso locked up in an attic with only blue paint.

Soon I will express my creativity by writing another law review article and more beautifully reflective blog posts like this one. And, yet, in the midst of my summer creativity, I will actually miss having those stupid kids around to ruin. I am most creative when bored, and most bored when creative. Down in my upness and up in my downness. How about you?

Reply Like (0)
therewillbeblood (May 10, 2013 - 2:15 am)

This jam goes out to all the law professors, hustlin' for what they can get, buried under exams, doing what they can to survive. Don't listen to the haters.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxtn6-XQupM

Reply Like (0)
relater2 (May 10, 2013 - 3:08 am)

Funny too how she all but admits by her boredom that law school 'marking' is essentially a pointless, basically arbitrary 'issue spotting award' related to nothing in particular.

Reply Like (0)
massivemissive (May 10, 2013 - 8:55 am)

She deleted my comment which wasn't all that over the top - but was the first. Coward.

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keithlee (May 10, 2013 - 9:58 am)

Ha. That post is certainly going to go over well.

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ichininosan (May 10, 2013 - 10:23 am)

She has seriously written seven (7!) law review articles on Gonzalez v. Carhart / reproductive rights: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/cf_dev/AbsByAuth.cfm?per_id=372606#reg

So many new angles to explore! I can't wait to see what creative new contribution to the literature comes out of this summer's research.

Reply Like (0)
anotherjd (May 10, 2013 - 11:11 am)

This borders on parody it's so smug.

It's sorta written in the style of OTs "Josephine", herself a parody.

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dtejd1997 (May 10, 2013 - 12:40 pm)

It is going to be even harder when these "profs" have to answer for their actions.

They should be ashamed.

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anotherjd (May 10, 2013 - 1:11 pm)

She's not evil like Leiter, just out of touch.

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patentesq (May 10, 2013 - 1:35 pm)

I thought this was a parody when I first read it. LOL

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depressedandhungry (May 10, 2013 - 1:39 pm)

This lady falsely assumes that her exertion in putting out law review articles is somehow a "productive" activity. Webster defines "productive," as something yielding favorable or useful results; or something that is constructive, creating goods and services to produce wealth or value.

Creating non-sensical, naval-gazing law review articles all summer which will never be read does not create value and hence is not a productive activity. This lady could dig a hole in her back yard and refill it all summer and it would create the same sort of value for society, NADA.

Reply Like (0)
anotherjd (May 10, 2013 - 1:48 pm)

Her most essential task is to fairly grade the exams that distract from her "creative" self indulgent scholarship that no one outside a narrow subset of academics will ever read.

Reply Like (0)
massivemissive (May 10, 2013 - 3:52 pm)

You know the thing about it is I doubt that even academics don't read it. Think about it: how many people, other than the student editors, read any law review article not published in HYS?

Zero.

What a waste of paper.

Reply Like (0)
depressedandhungry (May 10, 2013 - 1:46 pm)

If she thinks grading 80 exams every semester is tedious, she should shadow one of graduates who is 200K in debt and stuck making twenty bucks an hour in a document review mill.

It's elitist and out of touch comments like these which make you understand why there was a French Revolution.

Reply Like (0)
noobesq2 (May 10, 2013 - 1:55 pm)

Depressed...you should consider adding your thoughts in the comments section to her blog post.

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lolskewl (May 10, 2013 - 1:54 pm)

Honestly I think it's useless to engage these people on PrawfsBlawg and Faculty Lounge. It's like walking into a country club and chastising people for complaining about not being able to take a vacation to Europe AND spend a few weeks at their place in the Hamptons this summer. Sure, they could drop an ironic "first world problems" or something like that, but it's obviously not something that's really on their minds.

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noobesq2 (May 10, 2013 - 2:07 pm)

I disagree. It might be useless to put a repeat offender in jail, but we still do it. And, students outcomes should be more important to professors than their masterbatory writing pursuits.

People that have benefitted from the scam should be subject to some public mud-slinging at the VERY LEAST, especially when they are so blantantly out-of-touch and self-absorbed.

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lolskewl (May 10, 2013 - 2:23 pm)

Student outcomes should be top priority, but they are not. It's like saying the rich person should care about his bartender's rent troubles over his own personal problems. Sure, the bartender might roll his eyes whenever he overhears a rich patron complaining about whatever rich people complain about, but if the rich person really cared what the bartender thought he wouldn't be complaining. And the rich person probably wouldn't walk into the bartender's working class bar and start complaining there or he'd quickly receive a kick in the ass. I think that's how these profs see their blogs (as places students and lawyers have no business visiting) and that's why they never respond to comments.

I do find the lack of perspective and empathy in this county disturbing. It seems like a generational thing. Change is going to have to happen without these guys being a part of it.

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