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Lawyer-Heavy States See Higher Cocaine Use

http://www.abajournal.com/news/lawy er-heavy_states_see_highe deminimus08/17/09
Gee, ya think there might be some OTHER factors influencing Venceremos08/22/09
Or possibly some inherent flaw in those surveys that are use .exe08/22/09
New York has higher cocaine use than Idaho. Gee, who'd a th Venceremos08/22/09
Professionals are increasingly taking low doses of illegal d sanka08/01/17
Besides the city/rural distinction, how is this at all surpr thirdtierlaw08/01/17
You prolly would see more Adderall than coke. They just didn onehell08/01/17
And ice cream sales drive murder rates. anonattempt08/01/17
deminimus (Aug 17, 2009 - 4:47 pm)

http://www.abajournal.com/news/lawyer-heavy_states_see_higher_cocaine_use/
Cocaine is more likely to be used in states with heavy concentrations of lawyers, a statistical analysis concludes.

Marijuana use, on the other hand, is associated with states with higher concentrations of artists, scientists, architects and educators, according to the Atlantic’s analysis of data from the National Survey of Drug Use and Health. The findings showed a statistical correlation between cocaine use and the number of people in a state employed as lawyers and, to a lesser extent, in business and finance occupations, computer jobs, and management fields.

Psychologist Jason Rentfrow, who worked on the analysis, told the Atlantic: “I think it's interesting that cocaine is high for finance, law and quant professions. Although we can't infer whether it's people in those jobs actually doing drugs, those professions are generally regarded as intense and lavish. So it's interesting that an expensive stimulant like cocaine is used more often in places where comparatively large numbers of people work in intense and high-paying jobs. …

“It's also interesting that marijuana is popular in places with artists, designers, and architects because those are jobs that encourage divergent thinking, and marijuana is a psychoactive drug that's associated with creativity.”
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Comments

1.Posted by B. McLeod - 10 hours, 17 minutes ago
I have to wonder about the methodology of this “survey.” Did they mail a questionnaire or something?

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Venceremos (Aug 22, 2009 - 5:54 pm)

Gee, ya think there might be some OTHER factors influencing both, like, um, the presence of large cities?

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.exe (Aug 22, 2009 - 6:00 pm)

Or possibly some inherent flaw in those surveys that are used to compile drug use statistics where government workers go door to door and ask people if they use cocaine and if so, how often?

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Venceremos (Aug 22, 2009 - 6:05 pm)

New York has higher cocaine use than Idaho. Gee, who'd a thunk it?

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sanka (Aug 1, 2017 - 8:43 am)

Professionals are increasingly taking low doses of illegal drugs such as LSD and 'magic' mushrooms to improve their mood and performance at work.
The trend for 'microdosing', as it's known, has reportedly become particularly popular in California's affluent Silicon Valley


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4747422/Americans-drugged-work.html#ixzz4oVOT3H9y
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

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thirdtierlaw (Aug 1, 2017 - 9:21 am)

Besides the city/rural distinction, how is this at all surprising?

A profession that is notorious for grueling hours, the need to perform, and feelings of inadequacy finds more employees using a drug that, gives you energy, can help you focus, and makes you feel invincible and more confident. Seems like a no-brainer to me. But I'd have expected more afterall than coke.

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onehell (Aug 1, 2017 - 1:22 pm)

You prolly would see more Adderall than coke. They just didn't ask, and the data is harder to get because people just go to all-cash practices, part of the benefit of which is that you keep your medical matters away from the prying eyes of the insurance company compliance department.

With these "concierge medicine" practices, there's no insurance company flagging docs who fall on the wrong side of the bell curve, so they're less likely to attract DEA attention. Between that and the professional stature of patients who are able to pay 100% out of pocket, the docs are not as afraid to prescribe controlled substances like Adderall, valium, and oxy. And since there's no ready repository of data like there is with insurance claims, studies don't analyze it and the whole phenomenon flies under the radar, thus perpetuating the myth that drug abuse is a poor person's problem or one that is dominated by illegal street drugs.

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anonattempt (Aug 1, 2017 - 1:56 pm)

And ice cream sales drive murder rates.

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