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Half of prospective law students planning to use JD to go into a "non-traditional" field

LOL: http://www.abajournal.com/news/arti cle/forget_law_pr keithd04/19/13
Best comment from the article: "I have never understood why keithd04/19/13
I graduated with a JD/MBA. 99 out of 100 nonlaw employers w metsfan04/19/13
Of course if you asked them to name what these alternative f lolskewl04/19/13
(sigh) I want to save them all. But I can't. dupednontraditional04/19/13
Ah, optimism, and the days when I used to believe people who myth04/19/13
Geek/Loser alert: This is starting to remind me of that e myanushurts04/19/13
Awesome, never saw that episode. I'll have to look that up. dupednontraditional04/19/13
It's season 2 episode 8 entitled "Dream a little dream" myanushurts04/19/13
I've really never understood why anyone would deal with law tdkerabatsos04/19/13
Because Legally Blonde. superttthero04/19/13
keithd (Apr 19, 2013 - 8:50 am)

LOL:

http://www.abajournal.com/news/article/forget_law_practice._half_of_surveyed_prelaw_students_plan_to_use_law_degre/?utm_source=maestro&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=weekly_email

"Think a JD is only for law practice? If so, about 100 prelaw students disagree with you.

Half of more than 200 prelaw students responding to a survey by Kaplan Test Prep said they plan to use their law degree in a non-traditional legal field, according to a press release. Forty-three percent said they plan to use their law degree to pursue a job in the business world.

Among the students who planned to use their law degree in nontraditional fields, 58 percent said the current job market was a factor in their decision. Statistics paint a bleak picture of employment. A recent ABA report found that only 56 percent of 2012 law grads had found full-time, long-term jobs that required bar passage."

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keithd (Apr 19, 2013 - 8:52 am)

Best comment from the article: "I have never understood why anyone would get JD to enter “business” as a career when there are MBA programs."

It's because law school is an attempt by liberal artists to monetize liberal arts, without having to obtain work experience or go through any of the other rigors that generally accompany a vocational or professional degree program.

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metsfan (Apr 19, 2013 - 9:28 am)

I graduated with a JD/MBA. 99 out of 100 nonlaw employers will automatically remove you from consideration as overqualified because:
1) You're going to jump ship once you get a high-paying law job (not in this economy for lawyers);
2) If you can't get a high-paying law job and are considering anything else you must be a crappy lawyer (again, not in this economy for lawyers);
3) You'll be a pain in the ass because you'll point out everything you think is illegal (a fair point, but most know to keep their mouths shut); and
4) If things go south you'll sue the pants off the employer (actually we are less likely to sue because we know that employment at-will gives neither party much legal recourse).

These are naïve law students who "plan" to go into nonlaw fields. It's much like a 6-year old saying that when he grows up he "plans" to play center field for the Yankees.

"It's because law school is an attempt by liberal artists to monetize liberal arts, without having to obtain work experience or go through any of the other rigors that generally accompany a vocational or professional degree program."--That's one of the things that attracted me to LS, which so far has probably cost me about half a million in tuition and lost earnings (and lower-paying jobs than I could have gotten without the JD but am now overqualified for). Kinda depressing to know that I could've paid off the mortgage on my house and had some left over (and be making more in the near future!) had I gotten a job right out of college...

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lolskewl (Apr 19, 2013 - 9:39 am)

Of course if you asked them to name what these alternative fields specifically are they have no idea. They have some conception of wearing a suit to work every day, sitting at a computer, and pulling down 80K with benefits.

Ultimately, most law students don't go to law school to become lawyers. They go to become "corporatey-folk." If they can do this as a lawyer, great, if not, then they assume there are other options.

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dupednontraditional (Apr 19, 2013 - 10:38 am)

(sigh) I want to save them all. But I can't.

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myth (Apr 19, 2013 - 11:37 am)

Ah, optimism, and the days when I used to believe people who said "the JD is the new MBA!!"

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myanushurts (Apr 19, 2013 - 12:05 pm)

Geek/Loser alert:

This is starting to remind me of that episode of Farscape where everyone on a planet were lawyers. From Bar tenders to traffic cops

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dupednontraditional (Apr 19, 2013 - 3:09 pm)

Awesome, never saw that episode. I'll have to look that up.

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myanushurts (Apr 19, 2013 - 3:35 pm)

It's season 2 episode 8 entitled "Dream a little dream"

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tdkerabatsos (Apr 19, 2013 - 12:13 pm)

I've really never understood why anyone would deal with law school (financially or otherwise) if they don't want to be a lawyer. I went to school with a not-insubstantial number of folks who wanted to "do policy" in Washington DC. Most of them are now "doing document review."

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superttthero (Apr 19, 2013 - 1:01 pm)

Because Legally Blonde.

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