Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Summer Associate (no-offered) advice?

This is a rather unfortunate situation. I am now entering my rachels76308/05/17
Just explain the no-offer by saying that your summered firm malletofmalice08/05/17
I was no offered back when the economy was still crappy in 2 rising1l08/06/17
Read 'em and weep. Have you been applying for clerkships isthisit08/05/17
Yeah, that was the advice of a few colleagues of mine, I wil rachels76308/05/17
You've got a shot at maybe midlaw but they'll see your "no m isthisit08/06/17
You have an enormous problem -- and I'm not sure you appreci passportfan308/05/17
Weak. The market is screaming right now. The fog of 2009-12 vohod08/06/17
This guy gets the gravity of the situation but don't lie dur isthisit08/06/17
yeah, I know. This office had a similar problem last summer, rachels76308/06/17
99% of lawyers never work in BossPrick biglawl. 95% of those vohod08/06/17
Did you ask about transferring to an office with budget? 3L interveningrights08/06/17
" inquired if any other of the firm's offices in different c vohod08/06/17
Ah, sorry I had missed that. Something similar happened to o interveningrights08/06/17
Yeah, the firm is checking if there spots available in other rachels76308/06/17
Bummer. Do you have journal/moot court? Are you externing du interveningrights08/06/17
Might be a big law firm but not sure what you summered for w themapmaster08/06/17
Were you able to get any letters of rec? Would lend credenc 2breedbares08/06/17
you must do a clerkship, no matter if it's federal or state. dingbat08/07/17
you must do a clerkship, no matter if it's federal or state. dingbat08/07/17
People seem to be stuck in a 5-10 year old mindset. The mark mrtor08/07/17
mrtor said: "There are also plenty mid- and smaller firms t williamdrayton08/07/17
You're entitled to your opinion. But don't preach it as fact mrtor08/07/17
(playing devil's advocate,don't shoot me if I'm wrong) mrto dingbat08/07/17
thanks dingbat. as stated by the historical icon Meatloaf, " williamdrayton08/07/17
Princeton School of Law. isthisit08/07/17
I just love Princeton Law's Unicorn mascot. inho2solo08/07/17
Oh you read about it, huh? You're stuck in the past. I'm in mrtor08/23/17
If my middling you mean top 25%, since about half ain't even triplesix08/24/17
Sorry to hear that. Getting no offered is a HUGE red flag. D waka08/07/17
I'm not sure, my group was real estate and corporate which i rachels76308/07/17
why so salty beau? triplesix08/23/17
I would be begging them for the "cold offer" passportfan des onehell08/07/17
Well, the world needs ditch diggers too. waka08/07/17
OP, I'm in the same boat as you. Maybe we can help each othe hellosunflowers7908/19/17
The things we used to worry about when we were younger ... cacrimdefense08/21/17
"Just prior to writing this (oversized and painfully long) J mrlollipop08/22/17
Oh, changed substantially. Simply the advent of Microsoft Of cacrimdefense08/22/17

rachels763 (Aug 5, 2017 - 8:30 pm)

This is a rather unfortunate situation. I am now entering my third year of law school. I summered at a large law firm in one of their smaller regional offices. I was told they really like me but do not have the budget to bring on a new associate for that office.

Am I screwed? Usually, the first year associates are hired exclusively out of the summer program. I inquired if any other of the firm's offices in different cities have openings but was told those were filled by the summer associates in those offices.

I am sending my resume to a lot of different firms hoping that some of their summer associates may have declined offeres or are doing clerkshios meaning there might be availability. But I know it's very hard to find something and every student 3L who didn't summer anywhere in addition to the ones that did summer but were no-offered are applying for those few spots.

How should I explain the no-offer and what can I do to find light at the end of this tunnel?

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malletofmalice (Aug 5, 2017 - 10:33 pm)

Just explain the no-offer by saying that your summered firm didn't have the budget, as you described. This is actually a pretty good explanation, actually.

Big firm job at 3L? It's possible actually, but it's very case-specific. From what I've seen, there are two main factors that lead to success (other than grades). The first factor is whether you're going for a practice that is highly specialized and you have the background that shows you are particularly suitable for that practice. The second factor is networking and job search ability. Contrary to what people say, big firms do hire off-schedule. However, you need to know what to target.

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rising1l (Aug 6, 2017 - 6:33 pm)

I was no offered back when the economy was still crappy in 2010 at a regional biglaw firm but then 3L recruiting I was able to find another regional biglaw firm. How are your grades and school? If you come from a T14 and have good grades, everything is still in play.

You still need to keep up your grades. The reason behind that is because even if you get a midlaw job, it will be easier to lateral up to biglaw if you have good grades.

The headwind I see that you face is the fact that when I was no-offered a lot of people were sympathetic as to why. The economy was still pretty rough. Now the economy is as good as it will probably get and business is still pretty good. The excuse of "economic reasons" is likely not going to be as strong as in 2009 and 2011.

I had 2 partners really go out of their way to vouch for me. You need to do the same. Get 2 partners that you really worked close with to be your reference.

Another thing you could say at an interview is that "your position wasn't an official summer associate position."

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isthisit (Aug 5, 2017 - 8:35 pm)

Read 'em and weep.

Have you been applying for clerkships during this time? Don't be "too good" for state clerkships. Mass mail state trial and appellate judges and go after the Feds.

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rachels763 (Aug 5, 2017 - 8:39 pm)

Yeah, that was the advice of a few colleagues of mine, I will apply for state and federal clerkships.

What about other firms?

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isthisit (Aug 6, 2017 - 1:12 pm)

You've got a shot at maybe midlaw but they'll see your "no money to hire me" reason as BS. Whether or not that's right. But [email protected] it, apply anyway and give them your explanation if you interview. But practice delivering it so when you do give it, it's delivered with such confidence and clarity that they may buy it.

I'm very serious about the state clerkships. Apply to those in mass. It wont give you big law or mid law (appellate and SC will) but it'll make you attractive to the regional law firms.

Better than nothing.

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passportfan3 (Aug 5, 2017 - 11:27 pm)

You have an enormous problem -- and I'm not sure you appreciate its gravity.

Even if the partners at that firm all swore under oath on video that you were no-offered solely for economic reasons, no one will believe it.

Lawyers interpret all no-offers as "This person sucked." It is a mark of Cain.

My advice: Ask the most sympathetic partner at that firm to be your reference and to give you a "cold offer" -- meaning that, if asked, the firm will say you received an offer.

Barring that, you need to seriously consider lying to interviewers and saying that you were extended an offer but you do not think that firm was good fit, blah, blah.

The stigmatic effect of a no-offer is devastating and will repel almost all traditional firms.

You are in serious trouble.

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vohod (Aug 6, 2017 - 12:08 am)

Weak. The market is screaming right now. The fog of 2009-12 is long gone.

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isthisit (Aug 6, 2017 - 1:18 pm)

This guy gets the gravity of the situation but don't lie during interviews about getting offered and declining.

They'll probably want to speak to your supervisor at the summer firm and will ask about why you declined their offer. Your career will be over before it ever started.

Listen, you don't have big law anymore so forget it but mid law and regional is still in play. Get the best clerkship you can and then transition into a mid/regional firm.

Vayas con dios.

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rachels763 (Aug 6, 2017 - 2:44 pm)

yeah, I know. This office had a similar problem last summer, no budget last summer as well so not everyone was given an offer, I didn;t find that out until recently though and this is a well-known firm, so quite troubling.

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vohod (Aug 6, 2017 - 12:07 am)

99% of lawyers never work in BossPrick biglawl. 95% of those who do are out on their asses by age 29.

Focus on fed atty jobs. Biglaw experience looks great.

Private practice is a lose-lose for all players but the wealthy and prep-school class.

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interveningrights (Aug 6, 2017 - 4:38 am)

Did you ask about transferring to an office with budget? 3L OCI usually has a few spots. Otherwise, you'll probably have to wait for bar results to retry standard hiring.

The credited response is clerkship back into big law.

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vohod (Aug 6, 2017 - 10:56 am)

" inquired if any other of the firm's offices in different cities have openings but was told those were filled by the summer associates in those offices."

I think its safe to say this dump cut OP loose.

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interveningrights (Aug 6, 2017 - 10:51 pm)

Ah, sorry I had missed that. Something similar happened to one of our summers because he was in a really small satellite office. The firm later had another summer who did not accept and he was given an offer for that vacancy.

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rachels763 (Aug 6, 2017 - 2:42 pm)

Yeah, the firm is checking if there spots available in other offices. But most offices hired out of their summer class. I'm in the top 40% of my class gradewise, not sure if that is competitive for clerkships.

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interveningrights (Aug 6, 2017 - 10:59 pm)

Bummer. Do you have journal/moot court? Are you externing during 3L? A few peers externed during 3L and turned those into clerkships. T40% takes you out of most federal clerkships but you could always do state court or try for a federal magistrate.

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themapmaster (Aug 6, 2017 - 4:51 pm)

Might be a big law firm but not sure what you summered for was really big law. In my state there are big law regional offices but no big law

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2breedbares (Aug 6, 2017 - 7:34 pm)

Were you able to get any letters of rec? Would lend credence to your argument that you were no-offered for economic reasons.

FYI I was no-offered from a midlaw firm in 2009, graduated 2010. Probably the worst time to graduate and get a no-offer. It took a while to get where I am ($120kish salary, no billables, 9-5, 2 mile commute) but it's not the end of the world.

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dingbat (Aug 7, 2017 - 9:35 am)

you must do a clerkship, no matter if it's federal or state.
Then your resume will show Biglaw Summer Associate (big plus) followed by Clerkship (plausible reason for not doing biglaw)

You're basically going to imply, but never state, that you chose to do a clerkship over biglaw. That way, you lose the stigma of being no-offered, and become competitive for biglaw positions down the road. Coming off a clerkship there are biglaw entry opportunities - or at the very least you'll be a beast for midlaw

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dingbat (Aug 7, 2017 - 9:35 am)

you must do a clerkship, no matter if it's federal or state.
Then your resume will show Biglaw Summer Associate (big plus) followed by Clerkship (plausible reason for not doing biglaw)

You're basically going to imply, but never state, that you chose to do a clerkship over biglaw. That way, you lose the stigma of being no-offered, and become competitive for biglaw positions down the road. Coming off a clerkship there are biglaw entry opportunities - or at the very least you'll be a beast for midlaw

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mrtor (Aug 7, 2017 - 10:00 am)

People seem to be stuck in a 5-10 year old mindset. The market has changed dramatically. While disappointing, this rejection is not career-ending.

Sure, it may be difficult to climb back into a bigger law firm environment given their snobbery. However, there are still plenty of options. As many have mentioned, a judicial clerkship is probably your best cover if you still want to pursue a BigLaw career. There are also plenty mid- and smaller firms that will see you as a very competitive candidate. Unfortunately, those firms do not usually hire until closer to graduation or after the bar exam. Government is a very attractive option as well.

It will likely be a longer and more stressful year without something lined up, but you will come out of this just fine. I know far worse students from bottom ranked schools who got decent enough jobs. If you don't get into BigLaw, celebrate it. You avoided 3-5 miserable years before washing out.

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williamdrayton (Aug 7, 2017 - 10:21 am)

mrtor said:
"There are also plenty mid- and smaller firms that will see you as a very competitive candidate. Unfortunately, those firms do not usually hire until closer to graduation or after the bar exam. Government is a very attractive option as well."

please don't give youngsters overly broad blanket statements completely free of nuance or specifics. you sound like one of those CSO dolts.

outside of PD's and DA's, some governments are in a hiring freeze. (of course if OP happens to be interested in PD or DA, then the advice is credited, but we don't know her interest).

I don't want to be all doom and gloom and tell the OP that she will never get a law job - that's going to the other extreme. but blanket statements about "attractive options" are quite unhelpful.

aside from all that, it seems as if the best advice given on here is that OP vigorously pursue a clerkship - as dingbat noted, having a clerkship on the resume gives a plausible cover for not having a law job right out of the gate.

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mrtor (Aug 7, 2017 - 12:34 pm)

You're entitled to your opinion. But don't preach it as fact. I'm a few years out of a mediocre law school, easily landed my first job, and have lateraled since. Virtually all of my classmates have done the same. I know the current state of the market.

What gate are you even talking about? OP is a 3L and has almost a year to take the bar exam and find a job. There is absolutely no rush to jump into a clerkship.

To OP -- apply around and explore your options. Do not accept the doom and gloom prophecies of prior classes who have not enjoyed the market rebound. You may not enjoy the same quality of job (i.e. pay, prestige, etc), but you will be able to find a decent job. You can lateral from there.

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dingbat (Aug 7, 2017 - 12:49 pm)

(playing devil's advocate,don't shoot me if I'm wrong)
mrtor, I don't think williamdrayton was stating that your view was invalid, just that it would be better if you could give more specific advice than that there are opportunities available.

There are two equally wrong extremes: "a law degree is the path to riches" and "law school is a scam and there are no jobs". a little less extreme, but equally problematic is the equally vague but less extreme "there are plenty of possibilities if you look" and "there are some opportunities, but they're mostly sht". While both of those last two statements are somewhat true, they're at best completely useless in that the reader is no better off than before. Providing some details helps guide people seeking help.

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williamdrayton (Aug 7, 2017 - 4:42 pm)

thanks dingbat. as stated by the historical icon Meatloaf, "you took the words right out of my mouth".

my point was that neither extreme is helpful to a 3L: "there are plenty of jobs since the market cratered 5 years ago" AND "you will never get a job, go killself" are on equal footing.

unless things have changed in the last few years, I was always under the impression that 3L hiring was difficult simply because there are so few slots. I suppose some solos and small firms are more open to a 3L, but a lot of times those employers want bar passage before you walk in the door. hence the suggestions that OP seek a clerkship.

also, "midlaw" jobs tend to be kind of mythical for a newbie with absolutely no experience. lemmings have to be careful not to think, "I'm in the middle of class without law review and may not get $160k biglaw, but there have to be plenty of $100k midlaw jobs, right?"

even a few years after the worst of the market, I read that only about 55-60% of law grads get a bar required job; and that only includes the people who report to their career services - how many don't report at all? - something is dreadfully wrong with that picture

mrtor states that "virtually all of my classmates" easily landed a first job and then lateraled. I would like to know the name of the school so we can check the stats on Law School Transparency, which as far as I know is the most accurate source for employment data

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isthisit (Aug 7, 2017 - 4:44 pm)

Princeton School of Law.

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inho2solo (Aug 7, 2017 - 4:47 pm)

I just love Princeton Law's Unicorn mascot.

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mrtor (Aug 23, 2017 - 11:01 pm)

Oh you read about it, huh? You're stuck in the past. I'm in the present. Lose the condescension. "Attractive" job offers are not the same as "lucrative" or "extraordinary" job offers. I never suggested OP would make a killing. But a decent upper middle class lifestyle is more than obtainable for any middling attorney in this market.

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triplesix (Aug 24, 2017 - 9:08 am)

If my middling you mean top 25%, since about half ain't even playing the game from the beginning then this sounds about right.

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waka (Aug 7, 2017 - 4:42 pm)

Sorry to hear that. Getting no offered is a HUGE red flag. Did any summer associate get hired? If they hired even 1, you're effed. It tells future employers that you were the bottom of the barrel. The firm where you summered did the screening for them.

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rachels763 (Aug 7, 2017 - 10:41 pm)

I'm not sure, my group was real estate and corporate which is what I wanted and that group is not hiring, there was a litigation summer associate, not sure if they gave him an offer.

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triplesix (Aug 23, 2017 - 6:45 pm)

why so salty beau?

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onehell (Aug 7, 2017 - 7:53 pm)

I would be begging them for the "cold offer" passportfan described. I've definitely heard of those being somewhat common.

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waka (Aug 7, 2017 - 9:37 pm)

Well, the world needs ditch diggers too.

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hellosunflowers79 (Aug 19, 2017 - 8:49 am)

OP, I'm in the same boat as you. Maybe we can help each other find the light at the end of the tunnel together. I have the same handle on TLS if you want to PM me

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cacrimdefense (Aug 21, 2017 - 5:10 pm)

The things we used to worry about when we were younger ...

I hope the following gives the guy who started this thread an inkling of hope that his unfortunate turn of events does not signal the end of the universe as we know it.

-----

In my second and third years of law school, I roomed w/ four other guys in a five bedroom apartment that was a few blocks away from the lower-half-of-Tier-1-institution-located-in-a-medium-sized-city we attended. We were Roommate 1 (Alumnus of Old & Prestigious Southern Univ.), Roommate 2 (Alumnus of NCAA Scandal Univ.), Roommate 3 (Alumnus of Jim Harbaugh/Fab 5 Univ.), Roommate 4 (Alumnus of both a prestigious and expensive New England prep school and an Ivy League college), and Me (Alumnus of Obscure State Univ.). This story is about Roommate 4.

Unlike his other roommates, Roommate 4 was not a K through JD. He spent three years working in banking in Boston before attending law school. There was another difference separating Roommate 4 from the rest of us - He was pretty nutty. More specifically, he could be terribly emotional; often times yelling, screaming and stomping around in anger or frustration (It didn't really bother me as much as the others, b/c people in my family are all crazy).

During the course of my shared residence w/ Roommate 4, I learned that he came to law school w/ two specific goals. He was hoping to meet his future wife and he wanted to obtain a big law job in the Big Apple.

Before I really got to know the guy (our 1L year), Roommate 4 did two things. First, he obtained grades high enough to land him a spot on one of our law school's journals (not law review, but a topic related to my law school's "specialty"; i.e. something serious, not a joke of a "diversity" topic, etc.). Second, he became romantically involved with a so-so looking blonde w/ perky breasts, who was also an Ivy grad and student at our law school. She did well enough as a 1L to land herself on the Moot Court Board (at my school, the "honor" directly below membership on law review, and just above the journal Roommate 4 had graded on to).

These two shared a great desire to work in New York, and become fantastically successful and wealthy (in the near future). They OCI'ed and sent resumes like fiends during our second year. And sure enough, their hard work and effort was rewarded. Both Roommate 4 and his GF were offered summer associate positions for the 3 months in between our second and third years ... at the same big law firm in exciting New York City! This is before the days of e-mail and Facebook, so I had no contact w/ Roommate 4 that summer.

A little over a week before our 3L year started, I arrived back at our apartment in Medium Sized City, with most of my stuff packed into my car that I had driven from my parents' home in SoCal. I came a little bit early b/c my GF at the time, a Medium Sized City local, was anxious to see me and had made plans for us to take a trip to Florida beaches, before classes started. When I arrived, the only other two people in the apartment were Girl Who Had Rented My Room ForThe Summer and Roommate 4. After issuing standard greetings, I inquired as to how things in NY city had gone. He gave me a weak look and muttered something I could hardly hear. I didn't give his listless response any thought and started to bring things from my car into my quarters on the second floor of the apartment. While finishing the third trip from my auto to my bedroom, I walked into my room (with box and suitcase in hands) and found Roommate 4 sitting at one of my desks, with his face down on the desk and tears streaming from his face, collecting in little puddles where I had, just a few months earlier, commonly reviewed my class notes and pored over my Antitrust textbook. He related, in between gasps and sobs, that our Ivy League minted blonde classmate had ended their relationship about 5 weeks into the clerkship. Apparently, his GF had fallen for the charms of a young, handsome associate at the same firm.

Roommate 4 was crushed and beside himself w/ worry. With approximately 8 1/2 months separating us from graduation, how could he hope to find a future wife in that time? Besides, he only wanted to win back his old GF. His heart would not let go of what once was! He was in such bad shape that when my GF (who I had not seen in weeks) arrived at the front door, I got her to stay in the living room downstairs for 20 minutes, while I helped Roommate 4 pull himself together.

That first encounter w/ Roommate 4, just prior to the beginning of our 3rd year, was indicative of things to come. The guy was a mess. He attended maybe 60% of his classes, and would commonly come home, between 2 and 3 in the morning, from a nearby bar. As time went on, things got worse. First he started to drink too much. Then he added cocaine to the equation, and from December through March, he started to come home from the bar(s), after 2, in the company of disreputable inner-city looking types (they would then chat in the living room until the wee hours). Further, he was erupting in angry outbursts more than ever. Roommate 3 genuinely hated him. Roommate 1 just considered him an inconsiderate assh---, and Roommate 2 repeatedly told me that he would be emotionally scarred from his time having to co-habitate w/ Roommate 4. In contrast, my girlfriend and I just kind of felt bad for the guy.

Part of the fuel that caused Roommate 4 to grow worse, was the news delivered in the early days of our 3L year: Roommate 4 was one of two, of the twenty four summer associates at that NY firm, who was not extended an offer. I'm confident there was nothing wrong w/ his work product (he told me about some research assignments and projects). He just must have melted down and been insufferable/impossible to put up with during the summer.

When he wasn't boozing, coking, screaming, and bringing scruffy characters into our abode, Roommate 4 was desperately sending cover letters and resumes out to other big law firms in New York. By about Xmas, it had become apparent that the non-offer was toxic. Big firms simply didn't want him. He had failed the social screening test provided by the firm that had given him the summer associate position. In January, at the dawn of our last semester together, Roommate 4 did what had previously been unthinkable (to him). He started to mail materials out to higher level mid-law firms in New York. It really didn't sit well w/ him, and he sank into a depression. To Roommate 4, perhaps the only thing more depressing than stooping to sending feelers out to less prestigious firms was finding out such law firms also had no interest in him. This was despite the fact that he had received a letter of rec from the partner with whom he had worked the most, the summer before. This big law partner had piled on considerable praise for both Roommate 4's work ethic and his keen mind ... and it didn't matter. April came along and Roommate 4 had gotten barely a sniff (and needless to say, no marriage-worthy young lady had shown any interest Roommate 4). At the age of 27, Roommate 4's life appeared to be over! All the important plans and hopes he had for his life, that he had arrived w/ as a 1L, appeared to be unattainable ...

Then, for reasons unknown (unknown as to why the judge waited this long to fill his vacancy), a U.S. District Judge notified our law school that he was seeking a clerk. The prevailing candidate would be a federal clerk for a two-year period, commencing the fall after our graduation. We would be getting our diplomas in but a few weeks, and at this point, Roommate 4 had pretty much given up all hope. Nonetheless, he submitted a resume, cover letter, and a copy of the rec letter from the big law partner. Roommate 4 was selected for an interview, and from what I understand, he showed up for said interview royally hung over.

For reasons only the gods and spirits can truly know, this adjudicator (who was ancient) offered Roommate 4 the position w/o so much as a 2nd interview. But weeks prior to the end of our law school careers, Roommate 4 had been saved w/ a fed clerkship!

Like it was yesterday, I recall a late night conversation we had in our small kitchen, while our other roommates slumbered away. No doubt, Roommate 4 was genuinely relieved, however, he was also deeply worried about his next two years. The work was not his concern, but the location where he would reside was. The USDC where he would labor was out in the sticks; a smallish town in the same state where our law school was situated. He could not imagine that an Ivy League grad, born and raised in New England, could meet an appropriate girl to marry in this "Hicksville" location. With concern etched across his face, Roommate 4 added that by the time he wrapped those two years up, he'd still be single and just shy of "the big three zero."

Graduation day came and went, roommates went their separate ways to futures that awaited them, and Roommate 4 zipped off, out to the countryside, about 120 miles away. I saw Roommate 4 several times during the next couple years while he clerked. I stayed in Medium Sized City where the law school was located, and labored away at a Social Security Disability mill for a couple years. Roommate 4 would come back to get away from the country, just about every Friday evening. Occasionally he would stay w/ me. Sometimes he would couch surf at the abodes of the scruffy characters he befriended during our 3L year.

While he was clerking away, his judge's courtroom was involved in all sorts of legal matters pertaining to the "specialty area" my law school is known for (and that Roommate 4 wrote about during his time on the staff of the journal). Before the clerkship was done, Roommate 4 had a standing offer from the biggest (and most prestigious) firm in Medium Sized City (where our law school was located).

Another conversation I can recall, quite clearly, was one we had in the living room of my apartment (that I moved into after law school), after a Saturday night of serious bar hopping. Roommate 4 had pretty much given up his dreams of the Big Apple, and was telling me (in a fashion that seemed like he was almost trying to convince himself), that being a big fish in this medium sized pond was probably even better than success in New York, and that the slower pace of life would be rewarding, etc. etc.

Shortly thereafter, I moved away from Medium Sized City to return to sunny California. I next saw Roommate 4, 5 years later, in a large city in the Lone Star State. Roommate 1 was getting married to a cute Korean-American girl he met in East Texas, and Roommate 4 and I received invitations to attend this day of joy and holy matrimony. When I arrived at the church, I went in and sat down near the back. From where I was perched, I saw the back of Roommate 4's head (w/ a little less hair than I recalled). Next to him was an attractive young blonde. When the ceremony was over, and the attendees all congregated in the church parking lot. I walked over and shook Roommate 4's hand. He seemed genuinely pleased to see me, and he proudly introduced his female companion to me (Attractive girl; roughly a 7.5. Nice figure, good face.) Before we were out of the parking lot (and off to the reception), Roommate 4 quietly and excitedly advised me that he and his GF had been looking at engagement rings in a nearby mall (just prior to Roomate 1's wedding ceremony). We spoke further at the reception. Roommate 4 advised me he had made partner at his firm the year before. Further, he had purchased a nicely remodeled townhome in the best/swankiest part of Medium Sized City. As to his work, it was almost all related to big money transactions in the specialty area he had grown familiar with during his time with the law school journal, and while researching and writing for the ancient federal judge.

As old friends commonly do, we concluded our meeting w/ promises to stay in touch and to get together, that went almost entirely unfulfilled.

The last time I had any contact w/ Roommate 4 was a little over nine years ago. My beloved Lakers had just lost an NBA Finals to Roommate 4’s favorite team from his childhood, the Boston Celtics. Consequently, I called the big hitter firm in Medium Size City where he had become partner, and asked to be connected to him, to convey my congratulations. The firm’s receptionist replied that he had left the firm about three years earlier. After getting off the phone, I did a google search and discovered that Roommate 4 is working for a huge legal outfit headquartered on West 55th Street, in NYC. The firm also has offices on the west coast, in 3 major Asian cities, a variety of European locations, and the Middle East. I obtained his e-mail address and sent a message his way. During our e-mail correspondence that year, I learned that he was thrilled to be in New York City and that he loved the work in his office (which was pretty much the same specialized area of practice he was laboring away at in Medium Sized City). He related that he missed Medium Size City a little bit, but nothing that couldn’t be resolved w/ brief occasional visits. Also, his blonde GF I had met in Texas, years earlier, was still with Roommate 4, however, she had refused a trio of marriage proposals he had made over the years. Further, and perhaps most disappointing to Roommate 4, she had shown zero interest in having a child with him.

Just prior to writing this (oversized and painfully long) JD Underground entry, I looked Roommate 4 up on the web again. He is now (in his mid 50's and) in charge of the New York Office for the enormous firm he represents. I can’t say, however, what happened to the blonde or whether or not Roommate 4 ever found someone with whom to give his heart, along with a wedding ring.

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mrlollipop (Aug 22, 2017 - 11:37 pm)

"Just prior to writing this (oversized and painfully long) JD Underground entry, I looked Roommate 4 up on the web again. He is now (in his mid 50's and) in charge of the New York Office for the enormous firm he represents"

Sure, boomers advice: just work hard and work your way up. Time has changed,more biglaws are bellying up due to technology change and more law school students graduating without a job. It is not the 1970s anymore.

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cacrimdefense (Aug 22, 2017 - 11:58 pm)

Oh, changed substantially. Simply the advent of Microsoft Office has made lawyers far more productive than they could be when I graduated. Typists (in the day and overnight) tapped out all the documents in law firms when I first started lawyering. Between e-mail, text messaging and Word alone, attorneys now can crank out/accomplish about 75% more than when I entered the profession (so fewer of us are needed). Never mind the increase in productivity and speed brought on by the internet and computerized research.

Further, I borrowed two thirds of the money I needed to get a J.D., and graduated w/ tens of thousands in debt, not the hundreds of thousands some law school grads have today.

However, the point I was attempting to make above was not "hard work, etc." What I was trying to convey was that few things that seem like the end of the world in your mid-20's, actually are. That includes failing to get an offer from the firm for which one clerked as a 2L. Finally, your time reference was off. Me and the guys I roomed with didn't graduate in leisure suits or bell bottom pants. We grabbed our diplomas when the first Bush occupied the White House.

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