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When to send follow up/thank you e-mail

I've been applying to a few non-law but risk and compliance shouldagotamdinstead08/01/17
I never send them a thank-you email papi. But I do follow up isthisit08/01/17
I usually send an invoice for wasting my time with a pseudo- lawyer208/01/17
I usually try to get some free water or steal a pen on the w isthisit08/01/17
depends on circumstances. HR interviewing a thousand people dingbat08/01/17
Earnest Poast: This guy has it right. isthisit08/01/17
credited - it depends partially on the context of how the in williamdrayton08/01/17
After a day or so (it may have been two days), I sent a well wolfman08/01/17
Maybe I'm old fashioned, but I have sent hand written thank jd4hire08/01/17
As others have said, firing off a generic thank you to HR is mrtor08/01/17
shouldagotamdinstead (Aug 1, 2017 - 1:37 pm)

I've been applying to a few non-law but risk and compliance related positions. Should you always send a thank you/follow up e-mail within 24 hours of the interview like all the job sites recommend? Seems a little obsequious and not terribly helpful. I did send an e-mail thanking the hiring manager for the interview and letting him know of my continued interest two weeks after the interview took place.

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isthisit (Aug 1, 2017 - 2:04 pm)

I never send them a thank-you email papi. But I do follow up on the position within the timeframe they gave me before I left the room.

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lawyer2 (Aug 1, 2017 - 2:10 pm)

I usually send an invoice for wasting my time with a pseudo-interview for a position that was already given out before it was even posted.

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isthisit (Aug 1, 2017 - 2:20 pm)

I usually try to get some free water or steal a pen on the way out. Maybe make a pass at the QT behind the receptionist's desk.

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dingbat (Aug 1, 2017 - 2:19 pm)

depends on circumstances. HR interviewing a thousand people - don't waste their time. Partner interviewed you after a friend/relative pulled some strings - absolutely send a thank you letter... and a bottle of wine to the friend/relative. Anything in between is a maybe

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isthisit (Aug 1, 2017 - 2:20 pm)

Earnest Poast: This guy has it right.

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williamdrayton (Aug 1, 2017 - 4:07 pm)

credited - it depends partially on the context of how the interview was obtained.

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wolfman (Aug 1, 2017 - 2:28 pm)

After a day or so (it may have been two days), I sent a well-thought out, albeit brief, e-mail thank you note to the unit head who had given me his business card after a panel interview for a government (non-atty) job. In it, I noted that I wanted to attach a writing sample (although one wasn't requested) and attached a reasonably-sized one, which was actually somewhat relevant to the duties of my job. I work there now. YMMV, of course.

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jd4hire (Aug 1, 2017 - 5:13 pm)

Maybe I'm old fashioned, but I have sent hand written thank yous following nearly every interview. This applied even when I was part of a panel interview with 6 partners (coming up with 6 different, but similar thank yous was no fun).

I found a partner's notes from my first position. IT was on a legal pad soon after I started. He specifically noted that he received a hand written (underlined) thank you three days later.

Other partners at that firm commented over the course of four years about thank yous.

I did the same for my current firm. Recently, the named partner and I were traveling for a case and he noted that he was first hired at a firm solely because he sent a hand written thank you and the competing candidate (who was more qualified) did not.

An email and a note may express the same sentiment, but if you send a hand written note, it demonstrates that you spent time and effort to say thanks. I keep them short, thank them for their time, note something from the interview that they said or unique to the firm, and close with some suggestion of my desire to work there.

At the end of the day, it's a way to differentiate yourself. The art of the written letter has been nearly lost.

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mrtor (Aug 1, 2017 - 5:21 pm)

As others have said, firing off a generic thank you to HR is a pointless gesture. Following up with a decision maker, however, can be fruitful. It's also important to read the type of person you are dealing with. Some do not want to be bothered with symbolic followups. Others, see it as brown nosing. Many do appreciate it though. Know which type of person you are dealing with.

Frequently following up was appreciated by the hiring manager who brought me on board as a healthcare risk manager. It can go a long way with the right type of person.

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