Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Pros and cons

What are the pros and cons of taking a JD advantage or JD pr mera8806/16/17
Be advised, there are virtually no JD advantage/preferred jo lazlo06/16/17
Those are not "JD Advantage" jobs ... not really. Regardl patenttrollnj06/20/17
You'll actually be employed. isthisit06/16/17
It depends on the job. JD advantage and JD preferred can be mrtor06/19/17
Advantage is that it expands your job application opportunit vohod06/19/17
As if you actually have a choice. Law school graduates patenttrollnj06/20/17
180. plumber06/20/17
Need more information. A JD is required for doc review and f nighthawk06/21/17
So the position is a claims analyst position. I don't know i mera8806/22/17
Claims analyst for an insurance company? Car crashes? Fire d nighthawk06/23/17
Assuming you're not top 14 or top of the class and therefore onehell06/23/17
Completely agree with above. I work at a large corporation. jj8206/23/17
Unfortunately silly me went to law school in part to avoid c loblawyer06/25/17
mera88 (Jun 16, 2017 - 7:33 pm)

What are the pros and cons of taking a JD advantage or JD preferred job right out of law school?

Reply Like (0)
lazlo (Jun 16, 2017 - 9:30 pm)

Be advised, there are virtually no JD advantage/preferred jobs for new law school graduates. The JD can only potentially be of help combined with relevant work experience.

The only JD advantage/preferred jobs for new grads I can think of would be the following:

- law clerk for a judge (preferably appellate): technically you don't have to have a JD/be a lawyer, but it surely helps. In fact, it's the only job you're actually qualified to do right out of law school, lol.

- law school professor: I know of a few who almost immediately became professors after graduating, but that's rare, and typically they're T10 grads.

Now in theory having gone to law school would be very helpful as a paralegal, but in the real world a JD is not an advantage in applying for paralegal jobs; usually in fact it rules you out.

Reply Like (0)
patenttrollnj (Jun 20, 2017 - 1:22 am)

Those are not "JD Advantage" jobs ... not really.

Regardless, you're 100% correct.

Reply Like (0)
isthisit (Jun 16, 2017 - 9:53 pm)

You'll actually be employed.

Reply Like (0)
mrtor (Jun 19, 2017 - 10:28 am)

It depends on the job. JD advantage and JD preferred can be stretched wildly to make graduates feel like they didn't waste three years of their lives in law school. What are you looking at?

There are some fairly decent non-law career fields that are willing to recruit new JDs. Compliance, risk management, high level contract administration, federal law enforcement, etc. Unfortunately, those are largely eclipsed by more menial roles. Fields such as front line banking positions (loan officers, trust officers, etc.), title examiners, claims adjusters, human resources, paralegals, secretaries, low level contract analysis/administration, etc. (disclaimer: some of these can/do pay well under the right circumstances with the right employer).

Leaving law to pursue a JD advantage/preferred career is a major decision which should be carefully considered. It will be difficult to return to law once you have left. Not only because your skills and experience will likely be largely irrelevant, but also because of the prestige gap. Attorneys who drink the Kool-Aid don't understand why you would ever consider a career outside of law.

Reply Like (0)
vohod (Jun 19, 2017 - 1:56 pm)

Advantage is that it expands your job application opportunities dramatically.

Disadvantage is that you are probably not practicing law ever as a means of generating income. You could still do pro bono though.

FWIW most law grads aren't actively practicing law within a half decade anyways.

Reply Like (0)
patenttrollnj (Jun 20, 2017 - 1:25 am)

As if you actually have a choice.

Law school graduates have very few options. You take any job you can get, and you thank your lucky stars that you got it .... and hope it lasts.

Reply Like (0)
plumber (Jun 20, 2017 - 8:14 am)

180.

Reply Like (0)
nighthawk (Jun 21, 2017 - 9:00 am)

Need more information. A JD is required for doc review and for family law and for landlord/tenant. If you can get a JD preferred job doing health care compliance then take it. It is way better than fighting traffic tickets or ID. This applies whether you are straight out of law school or have been doing doc review for 12 years.

Reply Like (0)
mera88 (Jun 22, 2017 - 10:01 pm)

So the position is a claims analyst position. I don't know if I should apply for it right out of law school or try my luck with actual positions related to the field of law.

Reply Like (0)
nighthawk (Jun 23, 2017 - 9:24 am)

Claims analyst for an insurance company? Car crashes? Fire damage to a home. A neighbor who is a lawyer complains to me all the time how hard things are and how difficult the legal practice can be. He started as a T & E firm but started taking traffic tickets. Now he is the traffic ticket guy. When you hold yourself out to fight traffic tickets then that is how people view you. If a potential client asks he will hear that you fight traffic tickets and are therefore probably not the person to draft his will.

If you want to do PI then a claims analyst for GEICO is great, but not if you want to be a corporate lawyer. You can try being a margin clerk at a large bank if you want to get into corporate work. Then again, you can do proofreading if you want to do doc review or fight with your neighbor about how tall the tree should be if you want to do family law.

Reply Like (0)
onehell (Jun 23, 2017 - 1:16 pm)

Assuming you're not top 14 or top of the class and therefore have no reasonable shot at biglaw, the "pro" would be that the JD-advantage job would probably be for a larger organization. So it will have better benefits and perhaps more upward mobility. You probably don't even have to take the bar if you don't want to. That's a lot of expenses and hassle that you can avoid.

The "con" of course, is that you're not actually practicing. So you might find it harder to transition into practice even if you are licensed.

You'll also be both more and less geographically flexible. What happens if your spouse gets his/her dream job on the other side of the country? On the one hand, your JD advantage company may have lots of locations or allow more work-from-home, and there are likely companies with similar roles all over the country. On the other hand, you won't have been practicing so you won't qualify for reciprocity admissions in other states.

Overall, my general rule is that it is better to work for a larger organization than a smaller one. I would take a JD advantage role at a F500 company over an associate position in a small law firm that does divorces and DUIs in a heartbeat, unless I had a burning passion to hang a shingle and be my own boss one day.

Reply Like (0)
jj82 (Jun 23, 2017 - 10:40 pm)

Completely agree with above. I work at a large corporation. Good pay, benefits, 5 wks vacation you can actually use, nice offices, etc. The only people I know who stay in law went straight through and simply don't know any better since they only know full-time work as legal world. Once you see the other side, you would be insane to want to work at a mid-small law firm over corp. America.

Reply Like (0)
loblawyer (Jun 25, 2017 - 5:10 pm)

Unfortunately silly me went to law school in part to avoid corporate America. Now most of my exit plans involve trying to break into it. At the end of the day, a F500 has far more resources than a small firm. I'm at a nice firm, but I feel compensation is going to be limited by typical mid to small firm finances at some point.

Reply Like (0)
Post a message in this thread