Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Creative ways to descibe attorney role on non-law focused resume?

Project Manger is the best I can think of. vohod06/05/17
Sanitation Management Expert 3lol06/05/17
Risk management Compliance sillydood06/05/17
I'm struggling with same thing... I've been reduced to makin msbilliejo06/05/17
so my answer is emphasize skills related to job you're tryin msbilliejo06/05/17
I try to type it up more like a paralegal position and leave fettywap06/05/17
I am doing the same. Most of what I do is project and person vohod06/06/17
Document reviewer and drafter. For the transactional attorne isthisit06/05/17
The answer is to tailor the resume towards the job. So if i sjlawyer06/06/17
Focus on the core skills with a broader perspective. For a l mrtor06/06/17
Best of luck on your final interview, sounds like a fantasti junkwired06/06/17
Advocated on behalf of... Constitutional advocate... p nighthawk06/06/17
This is an underrated and all too true post. loblawyer06/09/17
I went with Law Clerk, Tax Preparer, Title Abstracting Clerk acerimmer06/06/17
"Development Consultant" "Governmental Relations Manager" " kansas06/09/17
Regardless what you write, you will need to explain this on nighthawk06/09/17
vohod (Jun 5, 2017 - 5:24 pm)

Project Manger is the best I can think of.

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3lol (Jun 5, 2017 - 5:47 pm)

Sanitation Management Expert

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sillydood (Jun 5, 2017 - 7:15 pm)

Risk management

Compliance

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msbilliejo (Jun 5, 2017 - 7:23 pm)

I'm struggling with same thing... I've been reduced to making separate resumes for different jobs applying for & trying to emphasize legal skills relative to the job... very tedious way to job hunt though. Also leads to the inevitable ? Why would you give up a decade + legal career to do this...? Non-lawyers don't seem to understand & instead seem suspicious of my motives for career change. Maybe I need a better way to answer this question too... bc apparently I'm "overqualified" for everything!

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msbilliejo (Jun 5, 2017 - 7:26 pm)

so my answer is emphasize skills related to job you're trying to get

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fettywap (Jun 5, 2017 - 7:35 pm)

I try to type it up more like a paralegal position and leave off things like appearing in court.

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vohod (Jun 6, 2017 - 7:46 am)

I am doing the same. Most of what I do is project and personnel management anyway. The law is rote to the point that only rookie OC less than 6 months in the field even bother talking about it.

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isthisit (Jun 5, 2017 - 8:04 pm)

Document reviewer and drafter. For the transactional attorney.

Professional arguer and tantrum thrower. For a litigator.

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sjlawyer (Jun 6, 2017 - 9:11 am)

The answer is to tailor the resume towards the job. So if it's contract-related work, a transactional attorney is a natural fit with document review/drafting like isthisit said.

For litigators, I think focusing on analysis of issues and problem solving is typically a good way to handle it. Crucially, it's all about focusing in on the job you're applying for and making your resume speak to that.

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mrtor (Jun 6, 2017 - 9:24 am)

Focus on the core skills with a broader perspective. For a litigator: Experience collaborating with multidisciplinary professionals. Strong research and writing skills. Attention to detail. Ability to independently manage a complex workload. Strong public speaking skills. Ability to negotiate and resolve conflicts. Etc.

You also need to become well-versed in whatever field you are seeking. Too many attorneys walk into these non-legal interviews intent on BSing their way through them and only learning more about the new field if they are selected for the job. Not surprisingly, most struggle to get past the first interview.

With these perspectives in mind, I was able to land interviews for a regional hospital risk manager position. I'm heading into the third and final interview with the largest hospital's executive team this week. It's been a challenging experience and I have been told to continue brushing up on field-relevant material and emphasizing my broader skill set. It can be tough to re-tool after working in such a specialized career.

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junkwired (Jun 6, 2017 - 10:05 am)

Best of luck on your final interview, sounds like a fantastic opportunity.

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nighthawk (Jun 6, 2017 - 3:14 pm)

Advocated on behalf of...

Constitutional advocate...

performed international transactions (filed slip and fall case against bank that has branches in Canada)

researched transfer of payment settlement (looked at westlaw regarding work comp)

escalated matters to higher authority (hearing before immigration judge)

reviewed financing documents (assisted in residential real estate closing of sale of $22,000 trailer)

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loblawyer (Jun 9, 2017 - 9:40 am)

This is an underrated and all too true post.

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acerimmer (Jun 6, 2017 - 6:46 pm)

I went with Law Clerk, Tax Preparer, Title Abstracting Clerk, and Debt Collector. All *technically* true.

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kansas (Jun 9, 2017 - 1:31 am)

"Development Consultant" "Governmental Relations Manager" "Acquisition Management" "SALT Consulting Group" And as stated above, project manager is always good. Good luck to you all! I go by real estate project lead these days, omg it's just like small firm transactions except I get a lot more time off.

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nighthawk (Jun 9, 2017 - 8:29 am)

Regardless what you write, you will need to explain this on an interview. If you write "child leadership executive" and someone asks you about it on an interview, you will answer that you were a babysitter. That may look very bad. Be creative but be ready to explain.

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