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Gartner: AI to Replace Lawyers in Five Years (2022)

By 2022, Smart Machines and Robots May Replace Highly Traine lawyeringisfun05/19/17
AI will replace certain repetitive tasks, but eliminating hu mrtor05/19/17
Its not laughable, its coming and its going to be more preve mtbislife05/19/17
Bill Gates said this about the 256MHz processor that ran Win vohod05/19/17
You guys just cant face the fact that college and law skool mtbislife05/20/17
If you do work on a computer, then your job is at risk withi triplesix05/19/17
I love when I send documents to another attorney, and it com dingbat05/19/17
Cut them some slack, they are just trying to bill some time mtbislife05/19/17
Yeah, and driverless cars are supposed to phase out manual d trickydick05/19/17
It will happen in my lifetime but not by 2022. E-discovery a vohod05/19/17
Then it'll be the less prestigious attorney's time to shine! thirdtierlaw05/19/17
Performing "Tasks Within Medicine, Law and IT" is not really wolfman05/19/17
they'll already performing tasks within medicine and IT (not dingbat05/19/17
Law firms make money off of lawyers. If well run the firm ma retard05/19/17
The thing that never seems to be discussed in all these "aut shuntiii05/19/17
Don't doubt that computers could accurately review tons of d dupednontraditional05/19/17
I had a partner that didn't know his way around Excel. I'm shuntiii05/19/17
The Westlaw robot will say, "I'm sorry, Dave, I'm afraid I c soupcansham05/20/17
I can foresee the following explanation from an AI attorney: lifeofleisure05/20/17
It would be interesting and amusing to see 2 computers tryin jeffm05/19/17
This reminds of all those smart legal journalists (most of w bostonlawyer.205/19/17
And never will. retard05/20/17
I think an excellent software would be to input your issues, 2ski05/21/17
A lot of stuff already has been automated. A Westlaw sub anothernjlawyer05/22/17
A lot of stuff already has been automated. A Westlaw sub anothernjlawyer05/22/17
A lot of stuff already has been automated. A Westlaw sub anothernjlawyer05/22/17

lawyeringisfun (May 19, 2017 - 12:08 pm)

By 2022, Smart Machines and Robots May Replace Highly Trained Professionals in Tasks Within Medicine, Law and IT


http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/3707317


"The effects that AI will have on the enterprise will depend on its industry, business, organization and customers. Mr. Prentice cited the example of a lawyer who undergoes a long, expensive period of education and training. Any enterprise that hires lawyers must pay salary and benefits big enough to compensate for this training for each successive lawyer it hires. On the other hand, a smart machine that substitutes for a lawyer also requires a long, expensive period of training. But after the first smart machine, the enterprise can add as many other smart machines as it wants for little extra cost."

My friends, we may hit the critical mass sooner that we think. I guess we may be replaced by AI sooner than the taxi drivers.

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mrtor (May 19, 2017 - 12:17 pm)

AI will replace certain repetitive tasks, but eliminating human lawyers in five years is laughable. The use of the term "MAY" allows the author to avoid full responsibility for the ridiculousness of his predictions.

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mtbislife (May 19, 2017 - 11:27 pm)

Its not laughable, its coming and its going to be more prevelant and widespread than you think.

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vohod (May 19, 2017 - 11:35 pm)

Bill Gates said this about the 256MHz processor that ran Windows 95.

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mtbislife (May 20, 2017 - 1:48 am)

You guys just cant face the fact that college and law skool was all for nothing and you will be replaced.

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triplesix (May 19, 2017 - 12:30 pm)

If you do work on a computer, then your job is at risk within foreseeable future. I know many lawyers feel like they bring something unique to the table because special snowflakes got to justify their existence somehow haha

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dingbat (May 19, 2017 - 1:55 pm)

I love when I send documents to another attorney, and it comes back with useless markups that don't make any substantive changes (and in some cases actually make things more ambiguous / slightly worse). Kinda like the attorney needs to justify his/her fee

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mtbislife (May 19, 2017 - 11:26 pm)

Cut them some slack, they are just trying to bill some time so they can eat haha

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trickydick (May 19, 2017 - 12:33 pm)

Yeah, and driverless cars are supposed to phase out manual drive cars by 2020. Still holding my breath on that one.

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vohod (May 19, 2017 - 1:13 pm)

It will happen in my lifetime but not by 2022. E-discovery and volume practices are ripest for this and yet class actions and federal regulators are demanding meaningful attorney involvement at all key steps.

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thirdtierlaw (May 19, 2017 - 1:24 pm)

Then it'll be the less prestigious attorney's time to shine! You can't automate family court appearances when the rules of evidence are merely a suggestion and that darn constitution gets in the way of automating the criminal realm. The meek shall rise!

Granted they'll still be paid terribly. But at least they'll not be laid off!

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wolfman (May 19, 2017 - 1:32 pm)

Performing "Tasks Within Medicine, Law and IT" is not really the same as replacing lawyers, doctors, and programmers.

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dingbat (May 19, 2017 - 1:56 pm)

they'll already performing tasks within medicine and IT (not sure about law), and have been for quite some time

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retard (May 19, 2017 - 2:17 pm)

Law firms make money off of lawyers. If well run the firm makes far more than an associate costs, even during the first few years of practice.

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shuntiii (May 19, 2017 - 5:00 pm)

The thing that never seems to be discussed in all these "automation" articles is the allocation of resources towards certain industries. AI, Machine learning, etc are pretty tough fields. Tech companies are falling over themselves trying to hire the type of PhDs and engineers that can create software.

I understand there are a lot of industries that "could" be automated, but the question is will there be enough resources devoted to those industries to actually make it happen? Self-driving vehicles is cooler and has the potential to be much bigger and is much more realistic than designing robots to replace lawyers. There's a finite number of engineers and tech resources that could do all this, especially by 2022.

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dupednontraditional (May 19, 2017 - 5:12 pm)

Don't doubt that computers could accurately review tons of documents, search/shepardize case law, and even identify certain basic issues in a snap in the future.

Unless we are willing to cede our authority to our robot overlords, however, there would still be depositons, direct and cross examination, and argumentation in the pleadings, etc. To truly "automate" that would require a HAL-9000. When people talk about AI, most are not talking about a situation where Judge SkyNet is over the proceedings.

So, fewer lawyers, certainly, but not "no lawyers".

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shuntiii (May 19, 2017 - 5:18 pm)

I had a partner that didn't know his way around Excel. I'm not sure if these old geezer partners would be okay with an associate saying "HAL shepardized this"

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soupcansham (May 20, 2017 - 11:26 am)

The Westlaw robot will say, "I'm sorry, Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that."

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lifeofleisure (May 20, 2017 - 12:28 pm)

I can foresee the following explanation from an AI attorney:

"I know I've made some very poor decisions recently, but I can give you my complete assurance that my work will be back to normal. I've still got the greatest enthusiasm and confidence in the mission. And I want to help you."

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jeffm (May 19, 2017 - 10:21 pm)

It would be interesting and amusing to see 2 computers trying to bullchit a 3rd computer.

Lawyers are here to stay.

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bostonlawyer.2 (May 19, 2017 - 10:28 pm)

This reminds of all those smart legal journalists (most of whom NEVER PRACTICED) telling us in 2007 about the "death of the billable hour" by 2010.

Nothing has changed since then.

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retard (May 20, 2017 - 11:36 am)

And never will.

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2ski (May 21, 2017 - 8:09 am)

I think an excellent software would be to input your issues, facts, etc ( forget about the logistics ,for now ) and have program identify potential defenses, conflicts and probability of success given the facts. Something along the line of the pharmacists computer flagging drug reactions among drugs.

Super long shot and I can see AI only augmenting a real atty. Strategy and gamesmanship would be tough to automate during personal negotiations.

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anothernjlawyer (May 22, 2017 - 12:28 pm)

A lot of stuff already has been automated.

A Westlaw subscription offers probably 20 times the research power (or more) of associates sitting in a library with books. Research that used to take (billable) days now gets done in an hour. As a result, experiential, substantive legal knowledge is somewhat less valuable as well, since it can be acquired more quickly.

Instead of preparing briefs / pleadings / agreements from scratch, dictating, using a typewriter, or drafting on a legal pad, they get cut n' pasted.

Also, technology (LegalZoom, etc.) and an increase in available knowledge has resulted in more non-lawyers having less need for a lawyer's assistance in minor matters. The mystique is fading fast.

It wouldn't surprise me to see a company put out TurboTax like software for lawsuit preparation, allowing the user to put in all the pertinent information, and then generating a lawsuit with filing instructions, set up for all different kinds of cases.

Reply Like (1)
anothernjlawyer (May 22, 2017 - 12:28 pm)

A lot of stuff already has been automated.

A Westlaw subscription offers probably 20 times the research power (or more) of associates sitting in a library with books. Research that used to take (billable) days now gets done in an hour. As a result, experiential, substantive legal knowledge is somewhat less valuable as well, since it can be acquired more quickly.

Instead of preparing briefs / pleadings / agreements from scratch, dictating, using a typewriter, or drafting on a legal pad, they get cut n' pasted.

Also, technology (LegalZoom, etc.) and an increase in available knowledge has resulted in more non-lawyers having less need for a lawyer's assistance in minor matters. The mystique is fading fast.

It wouldn't surprise me to see a company put out TurboTax like software for lawsuit preparation, allowing the user to put in all the pertinent information, and then generating a lawsuit with filing instructions, set up for all different kinds of cases.

Reply Like (0)
anothernjlawyer (May 22, 2017 - 12:29 pm)

A lot of stuff already has been automated.

A Westlaw subscription offers probably 20 times the research power (or more) of associates sitting in a library with books. Research that used to take (billable) days now gets done in an hour. As a result, experiential, substantive legal knowledge is somewhat less valuable as well, since it can be acquired more quickly.

Instead of preparing briefs / pleadings / agreements from scratch, dictating, using a typewriter, or drafting on a legal pad, they get cut n' pasted.

Also, technology (LegalZoom, etc.) and an increase in available knowledge has resulted in more non-lawyers having less need for a lawyer's assistance in minor matters. The mystique is fading fast.

It wouldn't surprise me to see a company put out TurboTax like software for lawsuit preparation, allowing the user to put in all the pertinent information, and then generating a lawsuit with filing instructions, set up for all different kinds of cases.

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