Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Job Hunting After You Quit

I know the old adage that you shouldn't quit your current jo ohiolawyer05/16/17
I'm contemplating doing the same thing. I'm in a similar pos warfrat05/16/17
You sound like me last month. Money just isn't worth dealing ohiolawyer05/16/17
For a moment, I thought your name was "WarFart". For that br lolwutjobs05/17/17
My best advice is see if you can get one or two people (co-w qdllc05/16/17
Would some explanation like this work - "my previous firm su ohiolawyer05/16/17
I like that. I think it's tactful and most attys who've been warfrat05/16/17
A little over a year. Within 3 months I realized that there ohiolawyer05/16/17
Does leaving after one year seem abruptly short? or is par f warfrat05/16/17
The person I replaced left within 11 months, so it seems par ohiolawyer05/16/17
Truthfully, you're in a bad spot. There are a lot of employe mrtor05/17/17
How dead set are you about staying in the practice of law? A flyer1405/17/17
I could see myself transitioning to another industry, but I ohiolawyer05/17/17
If you could see yourself going to the opposite corner of Oh flyer1405/17/17
I told my employer the truth. I hated family law and had to dopesmokeresquire05/17/17
How long were you looking dse? ohiolawyer05/17/17
i need to find the strength to leave my job. many of the sta legalbeagle05/17/17
why wouldn't you just lie and say you were still employed? fuckup05/17/17
This is also what I would do. If they think you still work t bucwild05/17/17
Were you still on the old firm's website? That method of ver loblawyer05/17/17
If he was at a small firm or a mill its easy enough to expla vohod05/17/17
The issue is what to do now, not what you should have done. nighthawk05/17/17
I am assuming you are in litigation? If that is the case you mtbislife05/17/17
But sophisticated employers, especially on the transactional loblawyer05/18/17
If I did it then so can you, and I almost certainly had lowe mtbislife05/18/17

ohiolawyer (May 16, 2017 - 2:41 pm)

I know the old adage that you shouldn't quit your current job until you secure a new one. But, my current firm is just a doozy with an overbearing demeaning managing partner and toxic work atmosphere. That combination gave me significant stress (for the first time in my life), which manifested itself physically (stomach pains, headaches, etc.). Because of that, I thought that quitting was completely necessary for my well-being.

How do I job hunt once my notice is up? How do I best explain that I had to leave my current job? Thanks for any insight you have to offer.

Reply
warfrat (May 16, 2017 - 2:55 pm)

I'm contemplating doing the same thing. I'm in a similar position.
I like the paycheck but it reached a point where i'm having trouble enjoying anything in life.

What sort of notice did you give? How did it go, with small, toxic work environments like ours i'd prefer they just show be the door but I doubt that's the case. I'm fairly confident I'll find something soon, but yeah, i'm not sure I can explain bolting after 10 months. I know your not suppose to talk bad about your previous employers, but I'd be okay with throwing them under the bus, I think my reputation is solid enough in mid-size city where I work that I'm credible enough to just be honest.

Reply
ohiolawyer (May 16, 2017 - 3:25 pm)

You sound like me last month. Money just isn't worth dealing with a beyond bad work environment.

I told them about a month ago I was leaving. Managing attorney asked for me to stay around until they found someone else and then he proceeded to be just as bad. So on Friday last week, I gave 2 weeks notice, which they are gonna keep me to.

Reply
lolwutjobs (May 17, 2017 - 3:47 pm)

For a moment, I thought your name was "WarFart". For that brief, beautiful moment my life was complete.

Reply
qdllc (May 16, 2017 - 3:13 pm)

My best advice is see if you can get one or two people (co-workers) who can and will vouch for the poor work environment. Have someone to back up your claim about why you felt it necessary to leave.

A reasonable employer understands that there are bad places to work that constantly lose people.

Reply
ohiolawyer (May 16, 2017 - 3:23 pm)

Would some explanation like this work - "my previous firm suffered from significant turnover, which made it a challenging work environment, so I decided to give my notice and focus on finding a new opportunity."

Reply
warfrat (May 16, 2017 - 4:36 pm)

I like that. I think it's tactful and most attys who've been around will know exactly what you mean without you sounding like sour grapes.

ohio - How long was your tenure there?

Reply
ohiolawyer (May 16, 2017 - 4:38 pm)

A little over a year. Within 3 months I realized that there would be a problem.

Reply
warfrat (May 16, 2017 - 4:59 pm)

Does leaving after one year seem abruptly short? or is par for the course where your at?
In addition to the explanation of quitting, I will also need to explain the short tenure. But the explanation you mentioned above covers both bases.

Reply
ohiolawyer (May 16, 2017 - 5:01 pm)

The person I replaced left within 11 months, so it seems par for the course (it's a small shop).

Reply
mrtor (May 17, 2017 - 9:33 am)

Truthfully, you're in a bad spot. There are a lot of employers who won't even consider unemployed candidates. We can argue all day long about whether it is an unfair prejudgment or stigmatization, but the reality is still the same. I would never recommend bad mouthing your former employer in an effort to explain your situation. If you need to say anything about it, explain that it was a difficult and challenging work environment and one which you did not see yourself in long term. Say it properly and they will get the hint.

You should volunteer with legal aid or another community organization if you are unemployed more than a couple of weeks. You want to show that you are continuing to be engaged and not simply sitting on your couch eating Cheetos.

Don't shoot for the stars. You're going to have to take whatever you can get given your circumstances. Once you're employed again, you can apply to more prestigious jobs. The name of the game is "minimize the gap." The longer you go, the tougher it will be.

Reply
flyer14 (May 17, 2017 - 11:10 am)

How dead set are you about staying in the practice of law? Also what area of Ohio are you in (are you willing to move elsewhere in the state?)

Reply
ohiolawyer (May 17, 2017 - 12:52 pm)

I could see myself transitioning to another industry, but I really would prefer to move back to an attorney position in the public sector before changing industries.

I am in Northeast Ohio and there isn't any chance of moving any time soon.

Reply
flyer14 (May 17, 2017 - 2:15 pm)

If you could see yourself going to the opposite corner of Ohio, I know a few public sector jobs outside of law that probably pay better than law after PSLF and benefits are factored in, and can probably get you in touch with the right people.

Reply
dopesmokeresquire (May 17, 2017 - 11:31 am)

I told my employer the truth. I hated family law and had to get out.

I got hired.

Reply
ohiolawyer (May 17, 2017 - 12:50 pm)

How long were you looking dse?

Reply
legalbeagle (May 17, 2017 - 12:37 pm)

i need to find the strength to leave my job. many of the staff have left, starting a year ago, and most of them have yet to be replaced. the partners here just dont want to pay and they all have really bad egos and judgment. ive been here for a long time and i know how they treat those that give their 2 weeks. they give you the cold shoulder, play mind games etc. heck, that's how they treat you even if you aren't leaving.

Reply
fuckup (May 17, 2017 - 1:47 pm)

why wouldn't you just lie and say you were still employed? I got my current job shortly after being fired from another job. I just acted like I was still employed there.

Reply
bucwild (May 17, 2017 - 3:56 pm)

This is also what I would do. If they think you still work there, they won't call your former job.

Reply
loblawyer (May 17, 2017 - 8:42 pm)

Were you still on the old firm's website? That method of verification is another unfortunate thing most law job applicants have to deal with that most of the rest of the work force does not. There was a thread on here, or maybe it was TLS, specifically about negotiating/begging to be kept on the soon to be former employer's website for a few weeks.

Reply
vohod (May 17, 2017 - 10:03 pm)

If he was at a small firm or a mill its easy enough to explain it away as saying they never update the website. My first firm had listed the current owner as an associate and the since-retired owner as the partner. My new firm only profiles equity partners. we Associates are fungible and not worthy of mention.

Reply
nighthawk (May 17, 2017 - 4:41 pm)

The issue is what to do now, not what you should have done. Anyway, you need to handle this diplomatically. Much will depend on the job profile you are now seeking. Anyone looking to hire will want to discuss what you have done previously. A good answer to this question is "while I want to work as a lawyer doing [ ], I did not feel that my daily tasks were the best use of my skills. My strengths are X and the previous firm used me for Y. I decided to leave the firm to focus full-time on finding a new job that would be a good use of my skills."

Reply
mtbislife (May 17, 2017 - 11:12 pm)

I am assuming you are in litigation? If that is the case you just need to move into gov or a transactional role, its the best decision I ever made. Sophisticated employers understand that things like PI and family law blow and shouldnt be questioning you intently on why you left. If they do then its probably another red flag.

Reply
loblawyer (May 18, 2017 - 10:37 am)

But sophisticated employers, especially on the transactional side, aren't usually looking to hire people from low end lit in the first place. You are one of the lucky ones for making the switch.

Reply
mtbislife (May 18, 2017 - 1:45 pm)

If I did it then so can you, and I almost certainly had lower grades and went to a worse skool than you.

Reply
Post a message in this thread