Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Plaintiff Litigation

Is it possible to become a competent plaintiff lit attorney thelegalwhore05/15/17
Maybe you'll survive jumping off of a cliff, but why would y mrtor05/15/17
Yes, it is possible. But it will take much more effort. ruralattorney05/15/17
Yes, but likely not without fumbling through and making a me pauperesq05/15/17
I can't work firm hours but I am open to working with a ment thelegalwhore05/15/17
No one wants to work the hours. However, it's how you learn mrtor05/15/17
I used to do these and taught myself how to do them. Employm fettywap05/15/17
I'd say any form of litigation would be the most difficult p trickydick05/16/17
Class action, no. I doubt any court will certify you as cla therewillbeblood05/16/17
thelegalwhore (May 15, 2017 - 4:34 pm)

Is it possible to become a competent plaintiff lit attorney specializing in employment matters (sexual harrassment, discrimination), personal injury, class actions without working at a firm or under a mentor?

Can you learn to be one on ur own?

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mrtor (May 15, 2017 - 4:42 pm)

Maybe you'll survive jumping off of a cliff, but why would you try it?

Self-learning is not a successful strategy for building a reputable practice. A select few may be able to pull it off, but the vast majority will either fail or amount to mediocre attorneys, at best.

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ruralattorney (May 15, 2017 - 4:40 pm)

Yes, it is possible. But it will take much more effort.

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pauperesq (May 15, 2017 - 5:29 pm)

Yes, but likely not without fumbling through and making a mess of several cases. Hopefully it won't rise to the level of malpractice. Keep your fingers crossed.

That wasn't meant as tongue-in-cheek. I can understand not wanting to work at a firm. You'd be crazy, though, to not seek out a mentor. You absolutely want someone who can walk you through the intricacies of the practice.

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thelegalwhore (May 15, 2017 - 5:40 pm)

I can't work firm hours but I am open to working with a mentor under a special arrangement. Thanks.

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mrtor (May 15, 2017 - 6:28 pm)

No one wants to work the hours. However, it's how you learn the practice. You put in your years, you learn the trade, and you might be ready to start your own shop in a few years.

You're playing with fire (or malpractice, rather) by doing anything less. Pull yourself up by the bootstraps, buckle in, and learn the practice properly. Law isn't comparable to the business world, wherein young upstarts can become self-made success stories. Law is a craft that takes many years to become proficient in. If you don't want to learn it, find a new profession.

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fettywap (May 15, 2017 - 5:45 pm)

I used to do these and taught myself how to do them. Employment law cases are very hard to win. Most of the cases are crap and clients will lie to you about why they were fired. It will be hard to make a living doing only this. Also be prepared to listen to some really dumb stories about why people think they shouldn't have been fired.

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trickydick (May 16, 2017 - 1:37 pm)

I'd say any form of litigation would be the most difficult practice area to teach yourself.

Administrative/transactional law is much easier to teach yourself because the governing bodies that make the rules in many such fields envision that participants in those areas will be or can be ordinary people acting without an attorney and as a result there are a lot of resources available for laymen to help them figure it out. There's little reason an attorney couldn't utilize these same resources to navigate a workers' compensation case, an application for a change in immigration status, to sell real estate, or file a petition for bankruptcy.

On the other hand, court's anticipate that litigation will be handled by attorneys and, while they may show pro se parties certain lee way, they will hold licensed attorneys to a higher standard. And litigation is usually governed by complicated codes of civil procedure which, even with the assistance of practice guides, can be difficult for seasoned attorneys to navigate let alone someone new to the profession.

All that said, there are solos out there who managed it and it can be done. I would never have done it but it's obviously not something most people would be game to try.

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therewillbeblood (May 16, 2017 - 4:39 pm)

Class action, no. I doubt any court will certify you as class counsel without extensive experience, unless you're talking about some really small class, low-money class action.

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