Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

good answer for "why do you want to leave your current firm"

when the main reason is to make more $$ prestiiigiousone05/04/17
Not sure why in the heck you'd need to sugarcoat your need t lawyer205/04/17
Cause they will think you are leaving them ASAP too. Its the vohod05/04/17
make more $$ jeffm05/04/17
I'm looking to expand my practice horizons and finally achie isthisit05/04/17
"I like the people that I work with, but I feel that my care guyingorillasuit05/04/17
This is the only answer. If you say it's for more money retard05/04/17
Regarding the easily confirming salary, I do not think that loblawyer05/06/17
I can recall three occasions in the past few years where a p retard05/06/17
That's insane, probably should be expected unfortunately, su loblawyer05/06/17
What the hell? prestiiigiousone05/08/17
I had the same thing happen to me. Applied to another local mrtor05/08/17
I knew my boss and the hiring contact knew each other from l mrtor05/08/17
To clarify in all three circumstances I am aware of it was a retard05/08/17
GIGS is credited. Only correct answer is "opportunity" whic sjlawyer05/05/17
I noted the lack of work, the lack of support in attempting jd4hire05/05/17
Depends on the job. Contrast the opportunities offered by th mrtor05/05/17
"Tapped all the fine asses available, now I want to tap some therewillbeblood05/06/17
nice prestiiigiousone05/08/17
prestiiigiousone (May 4, 2017 - 5:38 pm)

when the main reason is to make more $$

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lawyer2 (May 4, 2017 - 6:02 pm)

Not sure why in the heck you'd need to sugarcoat your need to adequately provide for yourself and/or family.

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vohod (May 4, 2017 - 6:19 pm)

Cause they will think you are leaving them ASAP too. Its the truth though.

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jeffm (May 4, 2017 - 5:39 pm)

make more $$

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isthisit (May 4, 2017 - 6:05 pm)

I'm looking to expand my practice horizons and finally achieve the models and bottles lifestyle I've always wanted.

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guyingorillasuit (May 4, 2017 - 8:38 pm)

"I like the people that I work with, but I feel that my career development trajectory has slowed down. I am looking to grow and take on greater responsibilities, but my current firm simply does not have those positions open."

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retard (May 4, 2017 - 8:48 pm)

This is the only answer.

If you say it's for more money they will ask you how much you were making. You can lie and elevate your salary but that's fairly easy to confirm. Or you can tell the truth and they realize they might be able to pay you less than they were otherwise willing to.

Plus now they know you are a whore who will run the first time a better number comes along.

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loblawyer (May 6, 2017 - 2:20 pm)

Regarding the easily confirming salary, I do not think that is the case in small law. Unless you're at a NALP firm or a firm with Glassdoor activity (that rules out most of small law), it should be relatively easy to pad salary for interviewing purposes.

Regardless, I do not think that most large firm / corp HR departments would give up that information. Besides, what firm would actually contact an applicant's current employer? That breaches the most important red line of the interviewing process.

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retard (May 6, 2017 - 5:42 pm)

I can recall three occasions in the past few years where a partner at the new firm unofficially reached out to a partner friend at the old firm and the jig was up. Only one actually lost the job though.

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loblawyer (May 6, 2017 - 8:24 pm)

That's insane, probably should be expected unfortunately, sure the other two were still marked men/women.

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prestiiigiousone (May 8, 2017 - 11:13 am)

What the hell?

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mrtor (May 8, 2017 - 12:18 pm)

I had the same thing happen to me. Applied to another local small firm and my boss met with me to discuss whether I was "happy" at the firm a week later.

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mrtor (May 8, 2017 - 12:21 pm)

I knew my boss and the hiring contact knew each other from litigating past cases. Never thought he would actually rat me out though.

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retard (May 8, 2017 - 10:01 pm)

To clarify in all three circumstances I am aware of it was after the hiring took place (in one case before the person started) and the new firm found out the person lied about how much they were making. They were NOT cases of blowing the whistle on an interviewing employee.

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sjlawyer (May 5, 2017 - 8:02 am)

GIGS is credited. Only correct answer is "opportunity" which a) sufficiently explains why you would leave your current firm and not the new firm and b) complements the new firm. That may even actually be true, even if new opportunities include extra cash.

I think, especially if you're coming from small law, "resources" can be a good answer as well, but it's position dependent.

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jd4hire (May 5, 2017 - 9:22 am)

I noted the lack of work, the lack of support in attempting to gain new clients/ market myself, and a concern over the lack of a partnership track. I got offered the job and am happily at my current firm for the last year.

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mrtor (May 5, 2017 - 10:36 am)

Depends on the job. Contrast the opportunities offered by the new employer against the those of your old employer. Never criticize your old employer. Instead, keep it positive. Focus on the what you are gaining with the new employer, not what you would be leaving behind at the old employer.

E.g. Seeking an opportunity to expand practice areas. Seeking more complex, challenging, and engaging work. Seeking opportunities for growth and advancement. Seeking an opportunity to excel outside of the confines of a traditional law firm environment. Etc.

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therewillbeblood (May 6, 2017 - 8:51 pm)

"Tapped all the fine asses available, now I want to tap some new ones, you know what I mean player?"

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prestiiigiousone (May 8, 2017 - 11:14 am)

nice

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